Frequently Asked Questions

Is it possible for a billing agreement to be issued from a non-sponsored source of funds, such as a gift account (a “non-sponsored billing agreement”)? If so, who is the appropriate contact?

It is possible for a billing agreement to be issued from a non-sponsored source of funds under similar circumstances as sponsored billing agreements but with variations in the process based on the specific circumstances.  Contact the SPA SRA assigned to your department for more information on non-sponsored billing agreements.

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How do I apply for an export license?

If it is determined that your activity requires an export license, yourExport Control Administrator will work with you to submit a license request to the appropriate regulatory body on your behalf. It is important to note that obtaining an export license from the Commerce Department usually takes 30 days; a license from the State Department can take several months; and a license from the Treasury Department can take 3-6 months.  Although there is no guarantee that a license will be granted, all three regulatory licenses have granted licenses... Read more about How do I apply for an export license?

How do I determine if an export license is needed?

Work with your Export Control Administrator to make this determination. Determining whether an export is subject to a licensing requirement is a complicated process that necessarily involves a full understanding of the item. Whether something is controlled for export is not intuitive. License requirements are dependent upon an item’s technical characteristics, the destination, the end use, and the end user.

Our department doesn’t do any exporting. Why do I need to be concerned about export controls?

Any item that is sent from the United States to a foreign destination is an export.  “Items” include commodities, software, technology, and information.  How an item is transported outside of the U.S. does not matter.  Some examples of exports include:

  • Items sent by regular mail or hand-carried on an airplane
  • Design plans, blue prints, schematics sent via fax to a foreign destination
  • Software uploaded or downloaded from an internet site
  • Technology transmitted via e-mail or during a telephone conversation....
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